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Active Requests
 
 1. NOVEL GENETIC METHODS TO MAP FUNCTIONAL NEURONAL CIRCUITS AND SYNAPTIC CHANGE (PAR-03-007).

This PA solicits applications to develop new genetic-based methods and technologies for the purpose of mapping functional neuronal circuits and synaptic changes in the mammalian nervous system. Emerging genetic and transgenic technologies can be used to single out functionally related cells or neuronal populations for analysis or intervention. Emerging genetic and transgenic technologies can be used to single out functionally related cells or neuronal populations for analysis or intervention. This PA would support the development of genetic-based tools to map neuronal interconnectivity, to monitor functional changes, or to drive functional changes within neuronal circuits as the first step in an effort by the NIH to create integrated genomic and functional connectivity maps of the mammalian nervous system.

APPLICATION RECEIPT DATE:  The receipt dates for this Program Announcement are: February 12, 2003, February 12, 2004, and February 14, 2005.

The PA is available on the Web at: http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-03-007.html

Archived Requests
 

1. Brain Molecular Anatomy Project: Gene Discovery  In The Developing Nervous System (RFP)

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) issued solicitation NIMH-00-DB-0006 entitled "BMAP: GENE DISCOVERY IN THE DEVELOPING NERVOUS SYSTEM".  The NIMH plans to award contract, which will expand the scope of the of  work performed under the contract (N01MH80014) to the University of Iowa (M. B. Soares, PI), to foster discovery of novel genes expressed in the developing mouse nervous systems. This contract requires the production of high-quality, representative cDNA libraries from specific anatomical regions of the mouse nervous system at different developmental stages to identify and discover the genes whose expression is restricted spatially and temporally during development. The utility of this approach for novel gene discovery, namely utilization of representative cDNA libraries and determination of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) present in the cDNA libraries, clearly has been demonstrated by the success of the on-going BMAP gene discovery project

This project was first advertised in the Commerce and Buisness Daily  (CBD) on July 12, 2000, and the due date for proposals October 12, 2000.

The RFP is available on the Web at http://www.nimh.nih.gov/grants/0006-cbd.cfm

2. Administrative Supplements for DNA Microarrays

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
announces an administrative supplement program to facilitate access to DNA microarray analyses for NINDS-funded research projects.  The program is intended to facilitate access to DNA microarray analysis for ongoing, peer-reviewed projects that have Specific Aims for which microarray analysis will provide clearly relevant data within the scope of the approved project.  Principal Investigators (PIs) with Research Project (R01), Program Project (P01), and Research Center (P50) grants funded by NINDS are eligible to apply.  The principal focus of this announcement is on the use and analysis of arrays.  This includes microarrays, reagents, scanners, and data analysis.  The purchase of microarray services from commercial vendors or from institutional facilities  is acceptable.  Requests for salary may be included, in proportion to time directly devoted to the supplemental project.  The program, however, is not intended to support the establishment of array-making facilities.  Requests for computers and software will be considered only if they are solely for use in microarray analysis.  This is a one-time announcement with requests submitted on July 3, 2000. 

Additional information about this program can be found at
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-NS-00-007.html
 

3. Targeted Mutations to Study Ethanol-Related Behaviors

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) announces a Request for Applications (RFA) to solicit proposals to use targeted gene disruption and overexpression techniques in mice to elucidate the roles of specific neuronal proteins in mediating the effects of ethanol on brain function and behavior. Applications must propose elucidation of the relationship between ethanol’s effects on a specific aspect of nervous system function and a specific behavioral effect of ethanol. NIAAA strongly encourages mouse geneticists with expertise in targeted mutagenesis techniques to seek collaborations with established alcohol researchers, in order to bring these powerful approaches to bear on the elucidation of the mechanisms of alcohol’s effects on behavior. Applications proposing creation of strains of mice bearing new targeted mutations or overexpressed transgenes, and applications proposing use of previously existing targeted mutations or overexpressed transgenes will all be considered responsive to this RFA. This RFA will use the R01 and R21 grant mechanisms. R21 grants may have a duration of up to 3 years, and a maximum budget of $100,000 direct costs per year. NIAAA intends to commit approximately $2.0 million to fund new grants in response to this RFA. Letters of intent are due on April 5, 2000, and applications are due on May 5, 2000.

Additional information about this RFA can be found at
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AA-00-001.html .

4. Gene Discovery in the Visual System

The National Eye Institute (NEI) announces a Request for Proposals for supporting the development of genomic resources for the human visual system. Proposals are being solicited for the production of high quality representative cDNA libraries from specific anatomical regions of the human visual system and for assessment of the utility of these cDNA libraries for novel gene discovery. The primary goal of this project will be discovery of genes expressed in the human visual system. It is expected that cDNA libraries, clones, and the resulting sequence data will be made available for the wide distribution to the scientific community. The RFP will be available on or about March 1, 2000 at the following web site: http://ocm.od.nih.gov/drc/rfp.htm. Proposals are due in 45 days after the issuance of the solicitation. 

Additional information can be found at 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-EY-00-002.html

5. High Throughput Analysis of Gene Expression Patterns in the Nervous System (RFP)

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) announces a Request for Proposals (RFP) for high throughput collection of gene expression patterns for the mouse nervous system. This data will be used to create a Web-based reference atlas that will be made freely available to the public. The following requirements are expected to be achieved during a three- to five-year contract: (1) generation of histochemical probes for gene products (RNA and/or protein) normally expressed in the murine nervous system; (2) production of tissue sections of uniform thickness and consistent stereotaxic position from the mouse brain and spinal cord; (3) histochemical processing of tissue sections to localize RNA and/or protein products at high sensitivity and resolution; (4) collection of optical images of gene product localization patterns in tissue sections for subsequent transfer into an image database. The throughput volume of this project is expected to be sufficient to collect data for at least 1000 genes/year by the beginning of the second year of the contract. Applications are due April 3, 2000.

Additional information about this RFP can be found at 
http://www.ninds.nih.gov/C MB/00-05/rfp-toc.htm

6. Administrative Supplements to Facilitate Studies on Gene Expression and DNA Variation

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) announces the availability of administrative supplements to NIA-funded research projects to facilitate studies on gene expression and DNA variation using high throughput technology, such as microarrays. These supplemental funds may be requested for 1) the purchase of equipment and supplies, 2) use of high throughput technology in NIA-funded research including for support of personnel, and 3) informatics to interpret the data obtained through such use. The work proposed must be within the scope of research goals proposed in the original application and approved by the initial review group and the National Advisory Council on Aging (NACA). This a one-time announcement with requests submitted on April 1, 2000.

Additional information about this program can be found at http://www.nih.gov/nia/news/adminsupp.htm

7. Gene Expression Profiling in the Nervous System

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and six participating NIH institutes announce a Request for Applications (RFA) to solicit proposals to develop exploratory research projects, which utilize neural tissue-specific cDNA reagents and state-of-the-art microarray technology, in order to quantify, in a highly parallel way, expression profiles of genes in mammalian neural tissue. The creation of collaborative teams is encouraged, in which scientists with expertise in neuroscience research, genomics, and bioinformatics work to apply innovative approaches for analyzing microarray data. This RFA solicits applications for R21 exploratory/development research grant award for up to two years in length, and may not exceed annual direct costs of $150,000 per year. The seven participating institutes intend to commit approximately $3.75 million program to fund new grants in response to this RFA. Letters of intent are due February 28, 2000, and applications are due March 29, 2000.

Additional information about this RFA can be found at
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-00-002.html.

8. Microarray-Based Research on Drug Abuse

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) announces a Request for Applications (RFA) for research grants for the study of drug abuse and related areas using microarray technology. NIDA is looking to develop a strong, multidisciplinary basic research program--drawing from neuroscience, genetics, behavioral science, bioengineering, and computational biology--aimed at adapting and applying microarray techniques to the general problem of drug abuse.The creation of collaborative teams that will develop innovative approaches for analyzing microarray data is encouraged. This RFA solicits applications for both research project grants (R01) and exploratory/developmental grants (R21). NIDA intends to commit approximately $2,000,000 to fund new grants in response to this RFA. Letters of intent are due February 28, 2000 and applications are due March 28, 2000.

Additional information about this RFA can be found at
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-00-003.html

9. Administrative Supplements to Support DNA Microarray Facilities 

The National Eye Institute (NEI) announces the availability of administrative supplements to NEI-funded research projects to assist institutions in establishing microarray facilities, designed to support the application of state-of-the-art microarray technologies to innovative vision research. A minimum of five NEI-funded research projects is required. Requests are limited to the purchase of equipment, supplies and technical support critical to the DNA microarray facility. Since these administrative supplements are intended to assist institutions, it is expected that applicant institutions will support personnel, equipment, and supplies associated with the establishment and operation of the facility. This administrative supplement program is issued in response to recommendations developed at a recent NEI Functional Genomics Workshop. More information concerning the workshop can be found at http://www.nei.nih.gov/funding/fgwr.htm Applicants may request up to two years of support; the requested budget may not exceed $250,000 total costs in year 1 and $100,000 total costs in year 2. This a one-time announcement with requests submitted on or before March 8, 2000. 

Additional information about this program can be found at 
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-EY-00-001.html.

10. Technologies For Gene Expression Analysis In The Nervous System

The National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke (NINDS) and ten participating institutes and centers announce a Request for Applications (RFA) is to solicit applications for research grants to develop new technologies or refine established technologies for gene discovery and gene expression analysis in the nervous system. The development of methods suited to the anatomical and molecular complexities of the nervous system is critical for quantifying gene expression in this system, and for understanding how changes in gene expression may correlate with different developmental, pathological, or functional states. Of particular interest are methods for increasing throughput and/or sensitivity of gene expression analysis, or for discovery of rare transcripts. The technologies supported in the RFA will be made widely available to the scientific community. This RFA will use research project grant (R01) and pilot project/feasibility study (R21) award mechanisms. The total project period for an application submitted in response to this RFA may not exceed 3 years. The participating 11 institutes and centers intend to commit approximately $5 million to fund new grants in response to this RFA. Letters of intent are due February 15, 1999 and applications are due March 18, 1999.

Additional information about this RFA can be found at
http://www.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-99-003.html.

11. Mouse Brain Atlas for Functional Genomics

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and seven other Institutes of NIH announce an initiative through a program announcement (PA) entitled "Mouse Brain Atlas For Functional Genomics", PAS-99-060. The aim of this PA is to solicit applications to develop a digital, multidimensional atlas that will serve as a platform for mapping gene expression data from the mouse nervous system. The informatics tools developed under this PA for handling mouse (C57BL6/J) gene expression data are expected to be extensible, scalable and modifiable so as to eventually accommodate genomic data obtained from the human nervous system. Atlases, informatics tools, and other materials generated in projects supported under this PA will be made widely available to the scientific community. Approximately $2 million per year is available for this initiative, which will support 4-7 grants of up to 5 years duration. 

Additional information about this PA can be found at
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAS-99-060.html.

Note: The notive has been issued to announce the inactivation of PAS 99-060, 

12. Brain Molecular Anatomy Project: Gene Discovery (RFP)

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke (NINDS) issued a request for proposals (RFP) to foster discovery of novel genes expressed in the mouse brain. All of the following requirements are expected to be achieved during thetwo-year contract: (1) obtainment of RNA from microdissected mouse tissue (10 brain regions); (2) preparation of high-quality cDNA libraries that arerepresentative of the genes expressed and are optimized to detect rare or unique transcripts. Reduced redundancy within each library and across libraries is expected; (3) assessment of the quality of the cDNA libraries through high-throughput sequencing; and (4) provision of materials and sequencing data to the wider scientific community.

This project was first advertised in the Commerce and Buisness Daily (CBD) on July 10, 1998, and the due date for proposals is August 21, 1998.

The RFP is available on the Web at 
http://www-grb.nimh.nih.gov/rfp0014a.htm.
 

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